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Showing posts from April, 2015

BlackBerry planning to shut down Sweden operations

NEW DELHI: BlackBerry is considering closing its offices in Sweden, a move that would result in the loss of up to 100 jobs, a company spokesperson told Reuters.

"At this time, we are considering the closure of our offices in Sweden. Since this may impact approximately 100 employees, we are now initiating consultations with the employees' trade unions," the spokesperson said in an email.

BlackBerry had about 7,000 people as of September 2014, according to the its website.

The company's Toronto-listed stock closed little changed at C$12.62 on Friday.

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E-commerce companies flood internet with ads

BENGALURU: Thejesh GN, a Bangalore-based technologist, does not have a Facebook app on his phone, often browses on incognito mode and has installed a tool that detects and blocks spy ads and trackers.

All this is to escape from the pervasive ads that have now begun to invade his online presence. But Thejesh knows it's of little use.

Given the proliferation of e-commerce companies in India, the barrage of ads are unlikely to stop. "It's an everyday fight. There is no way to get rid of all these ads," said Thejesh, co-founder of data science community Datameet. Thejesh represents a growing population of internet users who are becoming aware of the risks that come with their online habits -- specifically, having each data point of their everyday lives collected by companies and tech startups.

This includes an individual's IP address, browser type, pages viewed, and the date and time of use. On mobile, the data collected could be more elaborate and accurate -- including…

Net neutrality: Telcos warn of six-fold hike in data tariffs

NEW DELHI: Mobile operators on Friday said that they may have to increase data tariffs by up to six times to remain viable if the proposed regulations did not offer a level-playing field with net-based services such as Skype and WhatsApp.

Although they "supported" net neutrality and launched a campaign to link the unconnected to the internet, they said that high data rates would become unaffordable for a large number of people, denying them access to the Internet.

Click here to send an e-mail to Trai in favour of net neutrality

Pitching for same regulation for all communication services, COAI, the GSM industry group, said operators are required to ensure a level of service quality, share revenue with the government and intercept communication for preventing any terrorist act, but these rules are not applicable on Internet-based messaging and calling applications.

"If same rules are not to apply, then the only way this industry can be viable is data rate will be 6x fr…

Global customers warn Indian IT companies

CHENNAI: The world's largest buyers of technology such as Cargill, Target Corp and Lowe's have advice for India's biggest software firms: Adapt new technology and transform fast or become irrelevant.

At an exclusive session with ET, the technology heads of several global companies said Indian IT firms need to overhaul their businesses and strengthen in areas such as digital, analytics and cloud, particularly as many of the clients are building their own capabilities in advanced computing.

"If you see, areas such as digitization are largely not being outsourced right now," said Arindam Sen, senior vice president at Schneider Electric India.

Companies globally are channeling efforts into developing in-house expertise in areas such as analytics and cloud computing to stay ahead of their competition, also because large IT firms haven't been nimble enough to build capabilities in emerging technology more efficiently.

"Over a period of time, over 8-10 yea…

Woman sues Google after in-app purchases drain her bank account

One day last August, Susan Harvey tried to download a previously purchased app onto a second mobile phone, only to have Google's dashboard tell her that - yikes! - there were 109 transactions on her account.

Clicking on another tab on Google's site led her to find that, even worse, there were about 650 transactions listed, most of which she says she didn't recognise.

Her bank records told the tale: between April 2013 and May 2014, her account had been drained of thousands of dollars.

According to The Register, the California woman last week filed a lawsuit against Google in the Eastern California District Court, alleging that the search company's inadequate security enabled crooks to run up thousands of dollars in charges on her Google Play account that were then debited electronically without her sign-off.

Harvey also accuses Google of first refusing to reimburse her, then backing down and agreeing to refund the money, but ultimately failing to pay up as promise…

IS THE INTERNET REALLY MAKING US SMART?

The Internet has wrought incredible changes to learning, both in what we can learn and the way that we learn it. Not only is the information of the world largely available (free of charge) at our fingertips, but we also increasingly have access to new ideas and bright minds from around the world.

Is all of this actually making us smarter though? There has been a great deal of discussion over the years on the impact of the Internet on our brains, with respected voices ranging from Nick Carr to Susan Greenfield suggesting that the web is actually making us dumber.

Whilst this may seem hard to understand given the tremendous opportunities the web affords us, a recent Yale-led study suggests they may have a point.

The study, which consisted of nine separate experiments, found that when we obtain knowledge online, we perceive our knowledge as much greater than we do when the knowledge is obtained through other channels.

“This was a very robust effect, replicated time and time again,…

One in six Android apps is a malware, says study

BENGALURU: One in every six Android applications is a malware, according to a study by technology security company Symantec. The study also found that 36% of all Android applications are Graywares, which are not malicious by design but do annoying and inadvertently harmful things like tracking user behaviour.

In what could be seen as a warning to the large number of startups emerging in India, the study said cyberattackers are focusing more on small- and mid-sized business firms now since these are the ones that are increasingly creating intellectual property. It said 60% of all targeted attacks struck such organizations in 2014.

"The attackers know that a large portion of intellectual properties are generated from smaller companies. With hundreds of startups coming up every day in India, the number of attacks are likely to rise as companies give more importance to bringing a product to market quickly than on security," Tarun Kaura, director of Symantec's technology s…

Google launches its own mobile telephone service

NEW YORK: Google said on Wednesday that it was launching its own US mobile wireless service, with considerable potential savings for customers using their devices at home and for international travel.
The service called Project Fi is only available by invitation for now, and only for the Google Nexus 6 smartphone.
The service will use Wi-Fi hotspots along with the US mobile networks of Sprint and T-Mobile, and also may be used in 120 ..

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Buying a Wi-Fi Router? Here Are the Features and Specifications That Matter

Read at NDTV Gadgets If you're using Wi-Fi in your house, the odds are good that you just went with the free router that the ISP provides. It's convenient since you don't need to set up anything, and it saves both time and money.

And then the problems start - the network is slow, or doesn't reach most parts of your house - and there's not much you can do about it. Most people avoid buying a router themselves because of the complication of the specifications and the effort it takes to understand them.

You can try looking for alternatives yourself, but the router page on the company website or an e-commerce website doesn't provide you the details in a simple language that would help you make the decision. So you end up taking the path of least resistance and keep using the ISP's router.

That may work for some, but for most people it is advisable to invest in a better router, so you can get your home network working according to your needs. This way, you c…